Comics that stay on Code.

Getting kids to read for leisure is a big deal for me. Maybe that's why I buy so many Black comics.

A month ago I gave a copy of Tuskegee Heirs* to my favorite barista at a local Black-owned coffeehouse. Later she told me she enjoyed it, have it to her niece and she read the whole book.

Years ago, when my kids were toddlers, I used to have them page through Ebony magazine and point to the pictures. I'd say "She's beautiful. He's handsome." In an effort to inculcate a cultural sense of beauty in them early. I wanted to immunize them against the anti-african standard of beauty push by American media. That's when I was still married.

After the divorce, my Ex moved to the 'Burbs. I found out my kids were reading The Boondocks by Aaron McGruder. My youngest said of Huey and Reilly, "They're just like us."

Black magazines and Black comics in particular are a Win Win scenario for African People. The Black publishers get the support they need and their customers get the messaging they need to stay cohesive, informed and inspired. 

Buy Black comics by Black creators. You'll inspire your kids (maybe your neice) to put down social media and read again. -- fin.

*Tuskegee Heirs http://tuskegeeheirs.com

Tuskegee Heirs Comicbook interior.  Young pilots flying planes that turn into robots.

Tuskegee Heirs Comicbook interior.  Young pilots flying planes that turn into robots.